Blood Sugar Trampoline

The Death of the Animas Insulin Pump

Last week, Johnson & Johnson Diabetes, who own Animas, announced that it was “exiting” out of the insulin pump business, effective immediately in the US and Canada. And eventually in the rest of the world.

Once I read all the way down the press release to realise that it was just USA and Canada for now, I was relieved.

Then I was seriously miffed, but not completely surprised. Since the Vibe insulin pump was introduced, a number of years ago, innovation seemed to have stalled within the company. Johnson & Johnson own both Animas and the glucose meter company LifeScan/OneTouch but they didn’t even innovate between these products, not even to do what all others were doing and that was to sync products via Bluetooth or whatever internet cloud magic they choose. One might even say they really checked out of the diabetes industry a long time ago by their lack of interest.

So, what does this mean for us in Ireland? And what does this mean for me an Animas Pump user?

I have been using an Animas pump since my pumping beginnings in 2010. Then in 2014, I upgraded to the Vibe and in 2015 I added the Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGM) to it. I didn’t choose which insulin pump I would have, it was chosen for me, but I didn’t have any complaints. In fact, it’s been a great relationship!

Now I’m trying to think ahead and I realised that in the not too distant future I’m going to have to find a replacement for my insulin pump.

What are my choices in pumps? Do I actually have a choice, when the only other insulin pump my health service has a contract with is Medtronic? Yes it’s probably a good pump but I don’t want to be forced into it.

BUT it’s not just my pump I need to consider!

This also effects my CGM device. How will my new pump interact with my current CGM, if at all? My Dexcom receiver IS my insulin pump, meaning that my glucose sensor transmits the information straight to my pump. So I need to either get a new receiver device or change CGM’s.

And then, there’s my glucose meter which I was also able to upload to my insulin pump software programme which allows me to create useful graphs that help me make better decisions about my daily care. All of my information, from all of my devices is uploaded to the same place where I can see it all and it was easy!

Will I need to change both of these devices to make life easier?
What will the overall software platform be that I use?

I want to be able to upload/Bluetooth/cloud sync all my devices to the same place!

I want to use whatever d*** device I like best. And I really don’t like that I have to research all of this when managing diabetes is enough work already.

The Flu Vaccine what to do?

Photo credit Pixabay.com

Every year, around this time, I have a conversation with myself about whether or not I should get the flu vaccine. And every year I make a different decision. Two signs of insanity right there; talking to myself and complete indecision. Whose worried? Not me! Oops, there I go again, talking to myself.  😆

Should everyone with diabetes get the flu vaccines? Well that is completely totally up to you.

So far, I’ve only gotten it once and that was the winter I was pregnant with my now 13 year old daughter. Since then, I maintained that if it’s not broke don’t fix it and I never get flu so I didn’t bother.

Except last year, I had clocked up one or two flus that knocked me out for a week at a time, I decided that I was going to get it. However, when I went to my GP, I already had a cold and decided to wait but then never got around to it. I’m not sick very often so I figure the odds are still on my side. I do know as I approach 65 I will decide that I’m better off vaccinated.

This year I’m still undecided but maybe swaying towards the “I will” side.

If you are like me and still thinking will I, won’t I, here’s some additional information for about it

IS THE FLU VACCINE FREE FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES?

“Yes” and “No” because nothing is ever straight forward in our health system.

Yes, the flu vaccine itself is free to everyone in the “At Risk” groups which includes people with diabetes.

No, because if you do not have a medical card, a GP services card or a HAA card, you will have to pay for someone to jab it in.

A lot of pharmacy chains offer the flu vaccine so you do have the option to walk into one of those and have it done there and then without making an appointment. Next time you are collecting your diabetes supplies you can ask.

 

Pneumococcal Vaccine

Photo credit HSE and Diabetes Ireland, MSD

It’s also worth mentioning that the HSE have also launched a Pneumococcal Vaccine campaign which shouldn’t be confused with the Flu vaccine. I would like to thank our guest speaker, Paul, from our last diabetes support group meeting for clarifying this information for us.
WHAT IS THE Pneumococcal Vaccine?

“Pneumococcal disease is an umbrella term for a range of illnesses caused by a type of bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae (also known as the pneumo bug). It is a major cause of serious infection that can lead to death, particularly amongst the elderly, the very young, those who have an absent or non-functioning spleen, those with long term medical conditions*, or those with weakened immunity.”
SOURCE

However, the pneumococcal vaccination is USUALLY A SINGLE VACCINATION (ie once in your lifetime dose) for those at-risk. The most at risk group are children under age 2 years and adults over 65. Once you get it once you should be protected for the rest of your life. There are exceptions to this guideline so if you would like to know more ask your GP or visit http://pneumo.ie/

Thriveabetes; What is it? Why do I need it?

My children have been back to school for almost two full weeks now and since their first day back I’ve been spending a couple of hours most days planning Thriveabetes 2018.

A month ago, at our fundraiser, I was asked to explain what Thriveabetes is, why people with diabetes need it and why I was asking people to give money to it.

After my nerve wrecking speech, several people commented on how they had no idea that living with diabetes was so involved and required so much work. Why I keep forgetting this when I talk about my diabetes I’ll never know!

This post is to explain to people who don’t have diabetes, what living with type 1 diabetes is actually like, to explain what our conference does for people with diabetes, why I’m passionate about it and why I need it.

Here’s what I said;

What is Thriveabetes? And why do people with diabetes need it?

To answer these questions I have to, first, take you on a little journey. My journey.

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 24 years ago as a young adult and It changed my entire life. I’d like to be able to say that living with type 1 becomes easier but it doesn’t – it becomes habit.

I woke up this morning, a little groggy because my glucose alarm went off during the night telling that my levels were a little high. So I got up, checked them on my meter, worked out a correction dose of insulin, took it and went back to sleep.

Before breakfast, I checked my levels again; they were in target, so I took my insulin for my regular weekend breakfast of tea and toast also known as 40g of carbs and then ate it.

Two hours later with kids and car packed to travel across Ireland, I checked my levels again to see how close I came to getting it right. The answer was; not in target range, but close enough.

As I visited with my mother and family, I wondered what lunch was going to involve and when it was likely happen. It ended up being a sandwich at a Spar. I checked my glucose levels again. They were a little above my target, so I had to work out a correction dose of insulin plus working out an educated guess of how many grams of carbs were in this particular sandwich. Then I eat. My day, as with all other days, continued like this.

I do all of this out of habit. The numbers are very seldom perfect. But I get on with “close enough”.

Now imagine, that the person with diabetes isn’t you, but your child. So on top of all of those daily diabetes tasks that I do, you now have the added worry of “if I don’t do this “close enough” my child is going to get sick. Again!”.

This kind of anxiety and stress goes on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, etc. Diabetes NEVER takes time off. Ever.

This is why Thriveabetes is needed!

Thriveabetes is a place where you can relieve some of that stress and anxiety. The power and comfort of being in a room with so many people with diabetes, learning so much about managing daily life with it and knowing that every single person in that room knows diabetes like I do, lightens that load. There is no other place where we can get that.

It’s a day that is organised completely by us; people with type 1 diabetes. We are all volunteers who are dedicated to and passionate about bring people with type 1 diabetes together to share what we deal with every day and to learn from world class speakers.

And that is Thriveabetes. And that is why I need it!

Weight and W-Exercise Woes

I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist the alliteration.

Over that last number of years, I’ve put on weight!!! I’m not overweight… Yet! I don’t feel overweight but my clothes are tight and I feel frumpy.

I’m frustrated because I’m eating less and less, still fairly active but I’m still gaining weight. I’ve cut down of a lot of my carbs. I’m not willing to go carb free. I exercise a bit – I know I could do more but there are things that I have to do during my day and there are things on the “could-do-unicorn-list”.

The weight loss principle might sound easy, and simple; eat less and move more.  But in reality it’s not. And for people with diabetes who use insulin, even more so.

How We Burn Fat
HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM

When we eat, the glucose and sugar harnessed from carbohydrates are the first fuel sources. The liver stores the glucose in the form of glycogen and releases it into the bloodstream as necessary to keep our body trucking along. Think of your bloodstream as an interconnected conveyor belt that takes necessary nutrients to the body parts that need them. Once that glucose runs out, fat takes over. Harnessing energy by burning fat is referred to as ketosis.”

 

When a person exercises they burn up the glucose in their blood first, which usually keeps you going for about 20 minutes. In a person who does not have type 1 diabetes, when that glucose is used up, the body looks for glucose else where and the liver starts to release its stores. In a person with type 1 diabetes the body goes into a hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose).

It is extremely difficult to get your body to burn fat, when your body goes into the shutdown mode of hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose).

The Vicious Circle in disguise

I’m also frustrated because what I’ve read recently about losing weight when you have type 1 diabetes seem like the are written in a foreign language.

I feel weight management is a common problem for people who use insulin. And actually it’s been proven as the biggest reason people with type 1 diabetes don’t exercise; finding the balance between insulin, glucose and all the other influences on our glucose levels.

So what’s my plan of action. Well, for now, my plan is to keep up with the research and try to find more ways to move while getting all the other stuff done.

I might come up with a better plan but this is all I have left to give for now.

Short Sleeves and Stares

It’s summer in Ireland. But summer in Ireland means wearing a rain jacket a lot of the time or a cardi. However, the weather has warmed up enough recently and has been a bit drier to go out in short sleeves. This feels a little uncomfortable for me.

Why? I wear a gadget thingy on the side of my upper arm. It looks odd and in short sleeves it’s hard to miss. Especially, when I’ve been wearing it for a couple of weeks when I’ve had to put extra tape on it to keep it stuck on and it looks a bit “ick”.

It’s a continuous glucose monitor and it measures my blood glucose levels every five minutes and transmits this information to a receiver screen. This device also alarms when my glucose levels are too high or too low, giving valuable information that helps me improve my diabetes management.

When I first started wearing my CGM two years ago, I was very self conscious of it and would actually wear a cardigan to collect the kids from school just to avoid talking about it. Everybody I met commented on it.

These days, I’m less aware and forget it’s there most of the time. Until I’m walking around the grocery and I suddenly sense that someone is looking at me. Then I do become slightly more conscious of it. But it’s difficult not too because I can feel the looks.

I got into a taxi last year and the driver asked me if it was a bomb? So I’m always wondering if that’s what other people are thinking, especially going through airport security. Most people don’t say anything though. The strangers don’t approach me they just look.

I can live with the looks now and I’ve worn short sleeves more that I did last year. I’ve gotten over how self conscious I was of it at the beginning. Because it’s fricking awesome in what it does for me and my type 1 diabetes.

And maybe some day it will be the reason that another person with diabetes comes up to me and says “Hi”.

2016-09-09 img

Social Media & Information Blindness

I’m beginning to feel like I am becoming blind to information if it’s not being blasted at me on social media. If it’s not a flashy click bait image. And I think it’s making my brain die slowly.

Photo credit Pixaby.com

Last week, my husband told me, (and I heard him tell me!!!, not the nod and yes response), that our broccoli in the garden was ready for picking and we shouldn’t buy any for a number of weeks. Shortly after being told this, like an hour, I was doing the shopping and saw that broccoli was half price. What a bargain, I thought and bought it. What happened to my brain? Where did that piece of information go??

Is it that I’m so used to having instant information and that information is so easy to retrieve at any time on any device that my brain has forgotten how to retain information?

Ireland in the 80’s it was so easy to inform people and be informed. We only had two tv channels (rural Ireland that is – No Sky channel for us), two national radio stations and maybe one weekly local newspaper, we did have a couple of daily national broadsheets too. this meant was it was extremely difficult to be unaware of anything newsworthy and if you needed to get a public information message to the people the telly and radio were both sure things.

These days though it’s extremely difficult to reach out to people with information. Unless, of course, you spend a large fortune in advertising and then there are still people who are unreachable.

When something changes in the diabetes health service how do we let people know?

In the last few years there have been at least three major changes that affect people with diabetes in Ireland. This is just off the top of my head.

  1. In 2014, the HSE rule which prevented people with diabetes from holding both a medical card and a Long Term Illness book was changed to allow it. This meant that thousands of people with diabetes had to be informed that they now needed to apply for the LTI and should not be paying a prescription charge for the diabetes supplies and medications. I’m still coming across people in the diabetes online community who haven’t been informed of this!!!
  2. In April 2016, Restrictions were placed on blood glucose meter test strips for people who do NOT use insulin. See here.
  3. Most recently, April 2017, the change in the sugar content of Lucozade in both UK and Ireland. Every diabetes organisation and group carried this news and it even made it into mainstream media in both countries. There were posters in diabetes clinics (however, we are all looking down at our phones) all over the country. And there are still people who have not received this information, even though they are actively engaging in social media for their diabetes information. There are also people living in this world who even if you put the information right under their noses they still won’t see it. And given my broccoli evidence above this could be me!?! Aaaahhh!

This makes me hugely worried for the all of those people with diabetes who do not engage online for diabetes information. We tend to forget that a very large portion of the diabetes community is not engaged online at all. We can’t rely on the diabetes medical teams to reach every single person who attends their clinics with new information – it’s just not feasible or even possible. Someone will always slip through.

I think this is why offline diabetes peer support can play a huge role. We can help make sure noone falls through!

Diabetes Cured- What I’d Do First

I don’t know how long it took me to realise after my diagnosis of type 1 diabetes that what people were telling me about the cure being found in five years was total tripe! But I did! Not only that but I actually gave up all hope of it. Not in a bad way, I just got on living my life with diabetes and tried new treatments and didn’t spend much time thinking about a cure.

That is until I heard Aaron Kowalski speak at the Friends for Life UK conference in 2014. This talk was the most EXCITING and positive that I attended at this conference and I came away with a solid belief that the next best thing to a cure (either the Artificial Pancreas or Beta Cell encapsulation) is probably more than 5 years away but it’s close.

By the way, there is a Friends for Life UK conference happening this October and I believe there are less than 100 tickets left which can be booked here.  Find out more from their Facebook page.

Anyway, back to a diabetes cure and what if there was, some day, a cure? What would I do first?

I’ve struggled with an answer to this because there are so many things I could do, like eat a whole chocolate cake in one day but I feel like I really wouldn’t truly feel happy after the first slice. but what would I do first and most enjoy?

Diabetes Ireland’s Research Section

Then it came to me in a dream a couple of weeks ago and I remembered to write it down. I was on a very long, leisurely and invigorating walk. It was somewhere beautiful like the Burren, the view was spectacular. I was carefree and felt weightless. I was not one bit worried about my glucose levels at all. I didn’t have my glucose meter or supply of glucose with me – my rucksack so light. It was a good dream! It was a dream that made me feel happy when I woke up.

It was a dream where I didn’t feel lost if I woke up tomorrow morning and my type 1 diabetes was gone. I’ve been doing diabetes over half of my life and a lot of what I do is habit. I do glucose checks without thinking. Not only that but my blogging, advocating, reviewing educational material for pharma companies & event organising takes up so much of my life and I love doing it. So what would do instead? I suppose the answer is anything. And whatever I wanted.

Now I was on a roll and I thought about what it would be like to eat when I was hungry I may even enjoy food again. Be enthusiastic about delicious food instead of seeing meals as math problems.

Or What would it be like to go to the beach and not worry about sand getting into my medical devices or trying to keep test strips and insulin cool? What would it be like to go through airport security like a person without diabetes-oh wait that actually happened 🙂 see here. What would it be like just do something spontaneous?

What would it be like to have all that space in my brain that’s currently occupied by diabetes related decisions?

What would it feel like to not know what my glucose so levels were every minute of the day, but still know that they were normal???

Well now I’ve opened the can of worms I can’t seem to stop.

DxAmsterdam – The Complete Round up

This is the third and final post about DxAmsterdam.

My first post didn’t really relate to #DxAmsterdam at all but my experience of going through airport security to get to and from Amsterdam

My second post was published on Thriveabetes and was an update on the reimbursement status of the Freestyle Libre.

And this post is a complete round up of the weekend.

Friday afternoon, despite a dawn flight from Shannon airport, I arrived too late to be part of the organised bike tour of Amsterdam and to be quite honest I was relieved. I’m a nervous cyclist at the best of times but with so many people, cars and bikes everywhere in the city, I think I would’ve had a nervous breakdown.

I met up with my fellow European bloggers at the welcome reception that evening. It was familiar face after familiar face as soon as I walked into the room. However, only one or two of those faces I had met before. I love social media!!! It makes you feel like you are friends already. AND I have to say a very, very big thank you to Adrian Long (@AdrianLong3) for starting the Twitter message group so that we could do preliminary introductions in advance of the trip.

Next up was a presentation by a local volunteer organisation, much like Thriveabetes, who have their own support and information website and amazing projects. EenDiabetes.nl, which means One Diabetes Foundation, is run by a team of volunteers who write really good blog posts and are worth a look.

It’s founder, Mattias shared how he saw a need for a support hub for young adults with type 1 diabetes, being one himself, and started a private Facebook group which then evolved into a website. Does that sound familiar? 😀 This would have been an extremely valuable brainstorming session but, sadly, we ran out of time to complete it. We need something like this for our 20 + year olds with type 1 diabetes.

I loved that the host country did a presentation on what they are doing and why they started it. And it gave us an idea of what living with type 1 diabetes is like in the Netherlands.

We mingled afterwards over a buffet style dinner. A number of us soldiered on into the night, even though we’d all been up early to travel, there was huge enthusiasm to mix with fellow bloggers and find out more about diabetes in each others’ countries.

It all starts with a dream: Claire Lomas’ Story

Saturday was an early start too but it was SO worth it. We were joined by Claire Lomas, MBE from the UK and her husband, Dan. Claire’s life turned upside down on 6th May 2007 when she became paralysed from the chest down in a horse riding accident. “Claire was a Chiropractor and top level event rider when this freak accident left her unable to do the things she loved. Over time, she found strength and courage to rebuild her life by finding new interests and work as well as raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for research.”

You might be wondering how she raised that money for research? Well, in 2012, she walked the London marathon! Click on her website please!

Yeah, I know! And then!!! She showed us photos of her baby girls and that was the end of me holding in the tears. Claire spoke passionately about her journey from the day of her accident to when she found herself again.

She told us that people only see the not walking part of being paralysed. They don’t see any of the other problems, challenges, and health challenges, such as the loss of bodily functions below the chest, or accepting how much you body has changed in appearance and the wasting muscles. Such an amazing woman!

Claire also said for a long time she focused on what she couldn’t do and it was frustrating and disheartening. It was very difficult to find something to get up for in the morning. Then she started thinking about what she actually could do, even if the were little things, she started taking every single opportunity that came her way and decided to try everything. Claire’s talk lead us nicely into our next presentation.

#Dreambeyond: Inspiring others to dream

This was our introduction to Abbott’s Dream Beyond Ambassador programme which came about from a survey where it was discovered that 67% of parents of children with diabetes believe that their children’s lives are limited by it. In my experience of hearing stories from the Irish diabetes community I believe it will serve to educate healthcare professionals also. The stories we’ve heard from the professional type 1 diabetes cycling team; Novo Nordisk’s Team Type 1 and how “12 of the 18 guys in the 2016 team, were told by their doctors you’ll never race a bike again – that it’s just not possible with diabetes.” Well guess what!

Our next speaker, Josu Feijoo from Spain is aiming to be the first person with diabetes in space. He is being sponsored to travel under Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic space programme, which hopes to take two pilots and 6 passengers into orbit in 2018. Will Josu be abroad? We have to wait and see. Wouldn’t it be amazing to have the last glass ceiling of type 1 diabetes smashed to smitherings.

However, I’ve found lots of evidence that first person with diabetes in May 2006 was Geri Winkler, Austria, the first insulin dependant pwd and Will Cross, United States, the first person with type 1 diabetes. I’m struggling to find an official record of Josu’s climb that isn’t a media article but maybe he just hasn’t gotten around to it.

The power to dream: Life coaching session

Then, we had some personal development time with Personal coaching from In2Motivation on how to get to our dream/goal/objective/the thing that I want. And how to figure out what type of dreamer am I; explorer, planner, director, together and what I need to be more of. Our speaker told us that “Sometimes only changing one word opens a new door.” How our obstacles can sometimes be opportunities; Moments to pause, think or recharge. It was interesting and thought provoking.
Capturing the world through pictures: Photography learning tour
Next up was a Walking Photography Tour. I must say this is one thing I don’t do enough of – take photos. This is where I got my first real taste and smell (!) of the real Amsterdam and I might add took most of my photos. It was great doing this with other bloggers because that meant that there were numerous prompts for photos and I was actually in some of them!
Going further into diabetes monitoring: real-world data and innovations

We then had two presentations from Abbott representatives on the Freestyle Libre, how it’s impacting diabetes management and further developments to expand its connection to smartphones and software. I wrote about this here.

As we sat in this bright room that afternoon, I was struck by the high number of people in the room who were wearing some form of glucose sensor tech; be it a Libre or a CGM. There were 25 bloggers attending this event and we all had type 1 diabetes. I think that in the greater diabetes community this observation is very much the reverse. I’m usually one of the few people in the room who wears an insulin pump and/or a CGM. So for me to be in a room where I am not unusual was very nice. I think bloggers are such motivated people that they actively seek out better devices and information to better manage diabetes.

Quantitative Self Conference

Sunday, we arrived into an alternative universe full of people who love data, love to measure things like food, exercise, sleep, productivity and just life. This was the Quantitative Self conference where everything is quantifiable. I attended the “Measuring Food & Metabolism” workshop. The workshop was facilitated by a gentleman who took photos of his food to record what he was eating to help him improve his health. This was great for him because the simple act of taking the photo made him more aware of what he was eating and reluctant to eat junk food. However, the pwt1d in the room were waiting for what came next. What did he do with the photos? Well, this is where we took over the workshop, suggesting a multitude of apps to measure nutritional information and we gave a little lesson on what type 1 diabetes actually is. So one up for us in the diabetes awareness area! Wahoo!

After a quick bite to eat most of us boarded a bus back to the airport where a bunch of us got to hang out for a number of hours until our flights. For me, it was not being ready to say goodbye and face the long journey home solo. I’ve only had three opportunities to meet up with fellow bloggers and I don’t know when my next opportunity will be to consort with fellow “trouble makers” like myself. I just hope there is one:-)

Diabetes Blog Week – Day 4 What brings me down

This week is the 8th Annual Diabetes Blog Week and my second year participating. Diabetes Blog Week was started by and is still instigated by fellow type 1 Karen Graffeo in Connecticut who blogs at Bitter~Sweet Diabetes​.

This week is as a way for Diabetes bloggers (well over 100 participants from ALL OVER the World each year!) to share a huge variety of perspectives on issues relating to our illness. Learn more about Diabetes Blog Week here.
#DBlogWeek

Diabetes Blog Week – Day 4 – What Brings Me Down

Today let’s revisit a prompt from 2014 – May is Mental Health Month so now seems like a great time to explore the emotional side of living with, or caring for someone with, diabetes. What things can make dealing with diabetes an emotional issue for you and / or your loved one, and how do you cope? (Thanks again to Scott for this 2014 topic.)
I seem to be in a good place with my diabetes management at the moment, as I’m blogging less about my own diabetes experiences and more about what is going on in my wider diabetes bubble.

So my “What Brings me Down” blog post is more about all the things that are frustrating, overwhelming and make me want to cry in the world of diabetes advocacy.

However, there is one area that does bring me down recently. Several nights, not in a row, of CGM alarms disrupting my sleep are bring me down. Is it just a phase or is it a new trend? Being overwhelmed with the night time alarms not being consistent so I can’t use the information to make changes is bringing me down.

Oh and the thoughts of doing basal rate checks is bring me down too. I’ve no problem doing, no, I’ll correct that to, I have the least resistance in doing basal rate checks at night. Go figure that one!

My anxiety levels elevate a bit when I consider doing basal rate checks during the day because I’m always running around and I “chauffeur” during the day (school dropoffs and pickups). So, and please don’t be horrified by this, but in my 7 years on an insulin pump I have not done basal rate test in daylight. But since I learned more about Sugar Surfing last weekend I have a renewed ambition to tackle this.

What seriously brings me down is trying to explain what living with diabetes is like for me and not receiving compassion or understanding. Being met with the challenge of lack of knowledge and being met with a lack of empathy because the tabloid media and some health care professionals continue to reinforce the myth that diabetes is a self-indulgent condition and therefore deserved.

What brings me down is trying to fundraise for anything related to diabetes, especially to improve diabetes health care services in Ireland, in a world that doesn’t seem understand or want to understand why we need those things. What brings me down is how heavily we rely on our own community to fundraise when we are such a small one.

What brings me down is hearing that a new, much needed, health care professional has (finally) been appointing in a diabetes clinic only to find out that a vacancy or funding is pulled from another clinic in another part of the country. Case and point here;

“– In Waterford, the vacant Consultant post there was advertised last year and we have to wait over 6 months for interviews to be held and possibly up to a further year for the post to be filled.

– Following the transfer of a Consultant from Sligo Hospital to Limerick University Hospital, nothing is being done to date to recruit a replacement in Sligo.

– In Galway University Hospital, we are waiting for interviews to take place for the vacant Consultant post there which was recently re-advertised following the withdrawal of a successful candidate who was returning from abroad and who had accepted the post in 2015 and was due to start in 2017.” Source Diabetes Ireland

What brings me down is the fact that our health service published a standard of care document for children with type 1 diabetes in December 2015 and have absolutely no progress or indication that it will be implemented any time soon.

And finally, what brings me down is the fact that there is NO standard of care document for adults with type 1 diabetes and even if the health service ever gets around to publishing the delayed since June 2016 document for us, I feel like it will never, ever be implemented and I am on my own to advocate for myself.

It’s the never-ending-ness of the work needed in the diabetes advocacy world and the constant two steps forward, one step back and sometimes two steps back, that brings me down the most.

But I suppose it keeps me distracted from my own type 1 diabetes getting me down.
:-S

Diabetes Blog Week – Day 3 The Blame Game

This week is Diabetes Blog Week which is in its 8th consecutive year. This is my second year participating. Diabetes Blog Week was started by and is still instigated by fellow type 1 Karen Graffeo in Connecticut who blogs at Bitter~Sweet Diabetes​.

This week is as a way for multitudes of D-bloggers (well over 100 participants from ALL OVER the World each year!) to share a huge variety of perspectives on issues relating to our illness. Learn more about Diabetes Blog Week here.

#DBlogWeek

Diabetes Blog Week – Day 3 The Blame Game

Have you experienced blame and judgement from your healthcare team or someone else in your life – friend, loved one, complete stranger. Think about a particularly bad instance, how that person talked to you, the words they used and the conversation you had. Now, the game part. Let’s turn this around. If you could turn that person into a puppet, what would you have them say that would leave you feeling empowered and good about yourself? Let’s help teach people how to support us, rather than blame us! (Thank you, Brian, for inspiring this topic.)

I tend not to judge the friend, acquaintance or complete stranger too harshly when the say something that doesn’t particularly sit well with me. I find when I use this moment as an educational and awareness one we both walk away happy… I hope.

However, I actually feel a lot of judgement from a select few people with type 1 diabetes on all that I do to manage my diabetes. I was reminded of this by these words:

“You know, someone at my work has diabetes and they don’t seem to have all the things you have to manage it. Maybe you should try to simplify what you are doing. You don’t need all of those things.” from Diabetogenic.

I immediately thought of a conversation I’ve had that was so similar but this conversation was with a person with type 1 diabetes.

It was during the time that we were organising the very first Thriveabetes Conference. We sent out press releases to every media outlet we could think of, and a researcher from a very well known radio programme called me to, you know, do research. I immediately launched into my Thriveabetes “Sales” Speech about the power of peer support in helping people with type 1 diabetes and why I believed the event was so important.

It was only when I talked about the mental burden that living with type 1 diabetes can sometimes bring that this person revealed that she was a person with type 1 diabetes. She went on to challenge what I had said by saying that she disagreed with my personal experience of living with type 1 diabetes. She did not feel that way at all. She said that just got on with it, diabetes didn’t get in the way of her life at all and she didn’t think about her type 1 diabetes much at all. I did respond that I thought that was great for her but my experience and a lot of people I knew shared my views.

She made me feel like a failure! She implied that I was doing way too much to take care of myself and making a big fuss about an illness that she found easy to manage. I choose to believe her because I don’t know this person. Who am I to challenge her about how well she manages her diabetes? But I felt I was not getting the same respect.

It was so hurtful! And I didn’t know how to respond! I think that I may have gotten her back up a little with whatever my flustered response was because we never got a call back to do an interview.

This wasn’t the last time that similar conversations have happened. But I now feel that I handle them better. I jump in straight away with compliments on the diabetes knowledge and commend them for finding their way. I express my mild jealousy on how easy they have it. If this person allows me to explain a little about how I feel, that should be all I need. I hope that this is enough to illicit a smidge of respect and understanding that not all people with diabetes are the same.

Thankfully, it’s only a few select people that I have had these types of interchanges with, and the Diabetes Community is overwhelmingly the best bunch of people to hang with whenever possible. As experience at the recent #SugarSurfingDublin workshop 😀

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